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Posted by upender prasad (India) (Questions: 4, Answers: 3)
Asked on May 31, 2019 7:51 am
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Hi Upender,

The question can only be answered by the Manufacturer of the Medical device in question.

Various Standards may make a reference, but may not specify the exact frequency.

My experience is that 40 KHz is one of the most popular frequency at which surgical RMDs are processed.

There may be ultrasonic cleaners which employ 25 KHz, while there may be some which employ 125 KHz

However, the most important thing to know here is what do these frequencies imply.

Generally speaking,
The lower the frequency, the more violent (harsher) is the ultrasonic action. Of course, this could even damage certain delicate items. If we are to ultrasonic a heavy mass, or a large thick item (mallet, Osteotome etc), a lower frequency may be okay.
If we are looking at a processing a delicate item (Otis knife, Skin hooks, Cardiac bull dog clamps etc), going below 40 KHz may not be a good idea.

Imagine a tooth brush head of 1 cm x 3 cms.
If we had to cover the entire area by say 20 bristles, these bristles would need to be very thick. However, if we were to cover the area by 300 bristles, the individual bristles would be 10 times finer.
Obviously, the abrasive action of the thicker bristles would be way more violent as compared to those of the finer bristles.
At the same time, the finer bristles would reach smaller cavities, which the thicker bristles would not effectively penetrate.

If you are looking at purchasing a new Ultrasonic cleaner for your facility, It would be a good idea to invite the prospective vendors and show them your typical instrumentation. They will be able to provide more information.

At the same time, you may refer to IFUs supplied by various manufacturers of your existing RMDs

I hope the above was helpful.

Kind Regards

Ravi Nayak

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Posted by Ravi Nayak (New Zealand) (Questions: 1, Answers: 12)
Answered on June 6, 2019 8:16 am
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Thanks

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Posted by upender prasad (India) (Questions: 4, Answers: 3)
Answered on June 10, 2019 7:11 am

Ultrasonic khz frequency

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Surgical instrument cleaning what ultrasonic khz frequency required.

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Posted by upender prasad (India) (Questions: 4, Answers: 3)
Asked on May 31, 2019 7:51 am
83 views
0
Private answer

Hi Upender,

The question can only be answered by the Manufacturer of the Medical device in question.

Various Standards may make a reference, but may not specify the exact frequency.

My experience is that 40 KHz is one of the most popular frequency at which surgical RMDs are processed.

There may be ultrasonic cleaners which employ 25 KHz, while there may be some which employ 125 KHz

However, the most important thing to know here is what do these frequencies imply.

Generally speaking,
The lower the frequency, the more violent (harsher) is the ultrasonic action. Of course, this could even damage certain delicate items. If we are to ultrasonic a heavy mass, or a large thick item (mallet, Osteotome etc), a lower frequency may be okay.
If we are looking at a processing a delicate item (Otis knife, Skin hooks, Cardiac bull dog clamps etc), going below 40 KHz may not be a good idea.

Imagine a tooth brush head of 1 cm x 3 cms.
If we had to cover the entire area by say 20 bristles, these bristles would need to be very thick. However, if we were to cover the area by 300 bristles, the individual bristles would be 10 times finer.
Obviously, the abrasive action of the thicker bristles would be way more violent as compared to those of the finer bristles.
At the same time, the finer bristles would reach smaller cavities, which the thicker bristles would not effectively penetrate.

If you are looking at purchasing a new Ultrasonic cleaner for your facility, It would be a good idea to invite the prospective vendors and show them your typical instrumentation. They will be able to provide more information.

At the same time, you may refer to IFUs supplied by various manufacturers of your existing RMDs

I hope the above was helpful.

Kind Regards

Ravi Nayak

Marked as spam
Posted by Ravi Nayak (New Zealand) (Questions: 1, Answers: 12)
Answered on June 6, 2019 8:16 am
0
Private answer

Thanks

Marked as spam
Posted by upender prasad (India) (Questions: 4, Answers: 3)
Answered on June 10, 2019 7:11 am

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